Sunday, November 11, 2012

handwork


I've been thinking a lot lately about passing along the art of handwork for the next generation
sometimes I fear that such things will vanish in the fog of the glowing screen of Kindles and iPads
my own kids see me working with my hands constantly
sewing, knitting, painting, cooking
and I'm always so grateful when they express an interest
but it's a constant battle to get them to turn off the devices and open up a book
or better yet, learn a skill
*
but this was the scene today
we began work on a stitch sampler
and while we worked we talked about how I learned and who I learned it from
and how many generations have gone before us
and perhaps will follow
*
it was a good day to do the slow sew


21 comments:

Ms. said...

Ah such blessed domesticity...the hearth, the hands, the home!!

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

A genuine teachable moment!

Becca said...

This is so great Kimmie! Sadly I never took the time to learn from my mom or grandma...now, like crocheting for example, I am having to learn on my own...now I wish I would have paid more attention and appreciated those skills way back then!

Elizabeth said...

Lucky you. I can't imagine doing the same with my boys --

DAWN said...

That is a wonderful thing!
My boys all picked up their own craft in their own time. Each of them liking and being drawn to different things. The eldest is an artist of the utmost kind. Drawing, painting, sculpture. My middle son is a photographer preferring film! of all things. Right now he is taking pinhole photos like mad and I love it! my youngest is in the midst of teenagehood and hasn't found his medium, yet. He will.
All of them do laundry, cook and sew. It is remarkable the things that can't die. The basics, the simple, the tried and true. I hope you enjoy many more days like this with your brood.
Peace~
Dawn

JoZart said...

I really appreciate how you feel.
I have been teaching for a new project here "Hand to Hand" which aims to give craft skills, which are dying out, to young people. Many had never even threaded a needle! Included is embroidery, patchwork and quilting, bookbinding, screen printing, lacemaking and weaving.
After taster sessions they will continue one skill of their choice then make a piece of work to go into a big exhibition. It is so worthwhile.
Jo x

Snap said...

wonderful, wonderful, wonderful!

Tammy said...

How lovely! I'm afraid in this age of technology, many skills are being lost at an alarming rate. So nice that you are passing on your love for creativity to your girls. Have a wonderful week. Tammy

sharon said...

I love it, this is fantastic! My mom taught me early on how to sew, cook, and create, and it has always been invluable!

Gayle Price said...

Beautiful images, beautiful aspiration, beautiful story. xx

Corrine at sparkledaysstudio.com said...

Kudos Mom, they will thank you for it always. Is that a dog ear I see poking up from the blanket? xox

Rita said...

I wonder, too. I love to write letters and that is becoming a lost art, too. :)

Cynthia Eloise Starr said...

i think even if we don't teach them they will consider the arts and crafts as a way of life because we are always doing something. but i think it's great that you are taking the time for the one on one with your daughter. embroidery was the first thing my mother taught me. i still have some of the dish towels.

~*~Patty S said...

working with out hands helps us feel connected on a deep level...
your post makes me smile knowing that you are indeed sharing your passion(s) and teaching each time you create something

your daughters are so lucky to have you (and you them!)

makes me think of Heart in Hand
oxo
p.s. I was just talking with a friend today about how special it was growing up in a house without a dishwasher...that is when my Mom and I had some of our best conversations

~*~Patty S said...

working with OUR hands...deary me what a crazy typo that was

I'm afraid to read further what I wrote LOL

sukipoet said...

somehow i think there will always be handworkers in one way or another and you are indeed modelling this for your girls, even if it is only later in life that it "takes."

my mom taught me more by her doing hanwork than by actually teaching me as i was somewhat unteachable. i also had a grandfather and various aunts and uncles who did handwork including carpentry, furniture making, crocheting etc.

Halle said...

Teaching this takes patience. I want my kids to learn useful skills but I definitely need to learn to pick my moments. geesh!

*jean* said...

sew sweet...xo i hope someday that my son takes an interest in all that i have done with my hands...happy to hear that your daughters are trying...i still like to have my hands be busy even when i'm watching tv...i often think i would rather listen to a book than read so i can be busy on a project...

Kim Mailhot said...

I have just picked up a needle again, thanks to some time with my stitching witch friend, Elizabeth Beunsen, and it feels so good ! I am excited about a winter stitching in a cozy corner, under my OTT full spectrum light.
Brava to you for working so hard to pass this delight on to your kids.
Happy hand work !

Kim Henkel said...

beautiful work...beautiful day!

Tracey Fletcher King said...

Phantom is much better at sewing and things like that than I am... but she is always working and doodling and writing and it makes me so happy every time I see it...xx